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Category : Pottery

Akim and I are moving, and wish to offload as much as possible of things that we still want but do not necessarily need. Alas, my pottery and soaps fall into that category.

Pottery:

Since the majority of pottery requests that have come in have mentioned pieces that were specifically made for others and have been delivered already, I thought I ought to clarify which pieces/sets still remain. The sets may be bought as individual pieces.

Black Plate, $15 $12. Though it’s hard to tell in this lighting, there’s a faint swirl of what looks like a sort of celestial blue color, a bit sparkly, that looks vaguely like an Oort cloud or some sort of nebula.

Black Plate, edge view. As you can see, I make stew plates more often than flat plates. Some “plate” foods are juicier than intended, and I like to make sure that the tabletop and your lap will remain safe.

Cup Trio, $10/cup $8/cup. Left: small brown cup. Center: cobalt blue goblet. Right: Cream-nutmeg and orange-brown cup.

Cup trio, different view. This perspective shows the shape of the goblet.

Cup Trio, a third view. These aren’t a set, so they may be bought as individual objects.

Lace Plate, $20 $17 view of texture. This is not part of a set, and may be bought as an individual piece.

Lace Plate, edge view.

Oil Lamp, $11 $7. This will hold about 2 teaspoons of water and about 2.5 to 3-ish tablespoons of oil, which should burn for a couple of hours. The water will keep the oil from burning down to nothing and causing the lamp to shatter.

Oil Lamp, 2nd view. If you use a modern floating wick, simply place it in the larger opening. When using a medieval wick, put it into the larger opening, but place a plate beneath the lamp to catch the oil as it wicks upward and dribbles downward.

Oil Lamp, view 3. It’s easier to see the relative sizes of the openings in this view. The oil lamp was formed on a pottery wheel, perfectly round, then manipulated by hand into its current shape.

Oil Lamp, Cup Trio, and Lace Plate. These pieces do not comprise a set, so they may be claimed as individual items. However, if you would like to purchase the whole lot, it will be $1 off per item ($20 $17 for the plate, $10/cup $8/cup, $11 $7 for the lamp is  $61 $48, minus $1 per item for 5 items, total of $56 $43).

Oil Lamp, Cup Trio, and Lace Plate, top view.

Green and Brown Feastware. $10 for cup, $12 for bowl, $15 for plate, or $35 for the set. Moving sale, $30 for the set.

Green and Brown Feastware. Bowl.

Green and Brown Feastware. Cup.

Green and Brown Feastware. Cup, top view, better lighting.

Green and Brown Feastware. Stack, from above.

Green and Brown Feastware. Stack, side view.

 

Red and Purple Feastware. $10 for cup, $12 for bowl, $15 for plate, or $35 for the set. Moving sale, $30 for the set.

Red and Purple Feastware. Bowl and cup closeup.

Red and Purple Feastware. Stack, from above.

Red and Purple Feastware. Cup, detail.

Red and Purple Feastware. Stack, different view.

 

Raw Umber and Turquoise Feastware. $10 for cup, $12 for bowl, $15 for plate, or $35 for the set. Moving sale, $30 for the set.

Raw Umber and Turquoise Feastware. Bowl, detail.

Raw Umber and Turquoise Feastware. Cup, detail.

Raw Umber and Turquoise Feastware. Stack, from above.

Raw Umber and Turquoise Feastware. Stack, side view.

Blue-Brown Bowl, $12 $10. Holds about 12 fluid ounces.

Blue-Brown Bowl, view 2. I’m fond of the way the blue overglaze reacted with the reddish-brown underglaze, making those lovely patterns.

Blue-Brown Bowl. Inside view.

Blue-Brown Bowl. One last look.

Brown-Green Colander, $20 $18. What, you don’t see the green? Keep looking.

Brown-Green Colander. Now you can see the green. Surprise!

Not pictured: 3 ceramic business card holders, $3 each. They’re cute, but I’m tired of having to upload images. I just want to pack boxes for the big move.

Soaps:

Castile Soap. Though some soap manufacturers insist that their soaps are Castile because they’re made with only vegetable-sourced soaps, true Castile soap is made from only one kind of oil: olive. This is true Castile soap. It will be fully cured and ready to use on 1 September 2012. May be bought by the gram/kilogram, at $12/kilogram. I have roughly 2kg of this batch (about 4 pounds). If you take the entire batch that I have, I’ll only charge $10/kilo.

Soybean Oil Soap. This batch will be cured and usable on 1 October 2012. May be bought by the gram/kilogram at $8/kilogram. I have roughly 4.5kg of this batch. If you take the entire batch that I have, I’ll only charge $7/kilo.

 

Soap made from oils of soybean, castor, and coconut. The little ‘fluffy’ looking ones on the side are from the same batch, but my wooden mold wasn’t big enough to hold it all, so I put the overflow into little plastic molds. May be bought by the gram/kilogram at $10/kilo. I have roughly 2kg of this batch. If you take the entire batch that I have, I’ll only charge $8/kilo.

Soap made from oils of soybean and coconut. May be bought by the gram/kilogram at $8/kilo. I have roughly 4kg of this batch. (I originally mispriced the batch. It should be $9.50/kilo, but I’m not going to change the price. Consider this to be my moving sale price.)

Pottery #12

These pieces were completed sometime in the month of June. I don’t remember precisely when, but anyway, they’re my final pieces from the spring term at the pottery studio. I’m now taking two months off of production work in order to focus instead on taking a class and refining some techniques. I won’t be making more pieces for sale or barter until after the High Holy Days in September.

Pottery #11

These pieces were completed in the very last week of May and the first week of June.

Pottery #10

These pieces were completed in late May 2010.

Pottery #9

These pieces were completed in the latter half of May 2010.

Pottery #8

These pieces were completed in May 2010.

Pottery #7

These pieces were completed in March 2010, right in the days leading up to Gulf Wars.

Pottery #6

I made a set of feastware for a lovely woman, Ann of Walton Woods. She particularly liked a sample piece of mine that she saw, and mentioned with great warmth the rim of warm, rustic brown caused by the running of Mottled Red under Celestial Blue. I took great pains to achieve that brown rim. As it turned out, though, I’d misunderstood her enthusiasm for that brown rim as an indication that she wanted it herself.

Pottery #5

This is a set of feastware that I made for my own use in historical re-enactment. I say I made it, but it’s not entirely true. The cups with handles, I didn’t make. Someone else made them as test pieces, bisque-fired them, and decided she didn’t like them, so she put them on the “free to a good home” pile. I took the pieces and glazed them to go with my set. The glazes are Mottled Red all over, and Caramel  for part of the rim and/or inside of each piece.